Weekend Pass: Cops keep eyes on outlaw clubs (Sturgis, SD)

 Outlaw Biker, Weekend Pass : Biker's Rights and the Law  Comments Off on Weekend Pass: Cops keep eyes on outlaw clubs (Sturgis, SD)
Mar 042010
 


Outlaw motorcycle [clubs] might claim to be good ol’ boys who like to ride bikes, but law enforcement officers say that by definition, outlaw [club] members are involved in crime. Kevin Thom, director of the Attorney General’s Division of Criminal Investigation, said that he considers outlaw [clubs] to be organized crime.

To keep track of [club] activity, DCI completes a report at the end of the Sturgis motorcycle rally tallying all contacts officers have with [club] members and gathering intelligence information. Officers note who is enrolled in which [club] and what roles individuals have within the [clubs].

The information is then put into a report a few inches thick and shared with 35 states and five foreign countries that have an interest in the information, Thom said.

The information gathered this year will be used by DCI to prepare officers for the next year’s rally, Thom said. DCI puts together a Law Enforcement Safety Bulletin, a handbook of outlaw [clubs]’ identifiers and terminology, a timeline of violent motorcycle [club] involvement in South Dakota from 1981 to the present, and acts of violence nationally in the current year.

The crimes traditionally committed by outlaw [clubs] during the rally are drug possession and distribution, motorcycle theft and assault, according to Pat West, director of the Rapid City DCI office. In general, [club] members don’t commit random attacks against others. “If you mind your own business, everything will be fine,” West said. “If you pick a fight, you’ll get one.”

Anyone picking a fight with one [club] member might get more of a fight than he can handle, West said, because other [club] members will join in. “Every one of them is loyal to those colors and that group,” West said.

Law officers have been concerned in the past that [club] violence would erupt at the rally because of disputes between [clubs] in other parts of the country. In April 2002, a shootout between the Hells Angels and the Mongols in Laughlin, Nev., left three dead and 12 hospitalized. In February the same year, a fight between Hells Angels and Pagans in Plainview, N.Y., killed one and injured 10, according to the Associated Press.

Authorities here were alert for signs of problems at the 2002 rally, but none occurred, Thom said.

“Rivalries between [clubs] ebb and flow,” West said.

Motorcycle thefts are big business for outlaw [clubs], and professional thieves work motorcycle rallies, Thom said. Law enforcement officers work to prevent thefts and recover stolen bikes, and representatives of the National Insurance Crime Bureau come here to try to identify stolen motorcycles and parts.

Locally, the Bandidos is the only outlaw [club] with official chapters, two in the Black Hills and one East River. Hells Angels owns 120 acres north of Sturgis, and the Sons of Silence have a 10-acre campground seven miles north of Sturgis, Thom said.

A Rapid City Bandido, Christopher Horlock, 44, turned himself in June 21 in Houston after being indicted with 25 other people in Seattle, the AP reported.

Horlock, a national regional secretary for the Bandidos, was wanted on charges of conspiracy to tamper with a witness.

Horlock’s indictment and arrest was part of an offensive launched by federal agents and police against the Bandidos after a two-year investigation, according to the AP. Authorities served arrest and search warrants in Washington, Montana and South Dakota.

Source: know[clubs].com

Jun 242009
 

2591__orig

Yes, you too can tell the Citizens of society to F-Off by proudly displaying your own 1%er/FTW medallion!  This coin has been created by the Northwestern Territorial Mint for ANYONE to purchase… Yes, you can proudly display this in your home with absolutely nothing to back it up!  Who needs the hassle of prospecting for months or years to prove your mettle when, for only .50, you can own one of these fine tokens of your 1%er mentality…  The following comes straight from the website:

“Trouble was caused by the one percent deviant that tarnishes the public image of both motorcycles and motorcyclists.” – American Motorcycle Association, responding to the Hollister Motorcycle Rally in 1947.

The most feared and respected riders roaming the blacktop, one percenters are a breed apart from all others. These individuals bow to no one, test the boundaries of all and give their devotion to few.  The 1%er insignia is worn with pride by those who choose not to settle, not to give in to polite society but instead ride with the wind in their face and their back to the status quo.

How do you become a one percenter? If you have to ask the question, you won’t understand the answer. Only another one percenter can truly understand what belonging takes. These riders find freedom in the style they see fit and apologizing to no one for it. A brotherhood on two wheels, a bold way of life – a one percenter is the ultimate expression of liberty.

This coin is diamond-shaped, reflecting the “one-percenter” design that the select clubs use to show their allegiance to their club. Against a pitch-black backdrop, the reverse features a grinning skull above the letters “FTW” – shorthand for a take-no-prisoner worldview commonly held among club members. The obverse shows the “1%er” text. Minted in a nickel alloy, this coin is imbued with ebony enamel on both sides.

Might as well buy two or three of these.  And if you are interested, you can get some cool accessories like a small carrying pouch (in blue, burgundy, or black), or a hip acrylic stand!  The coins start shipping the first of July and I would suggest getting yours on order now to be sure you have one or two in place in time for the second season of Sons of Anarchy to air.

http://store.nwtmint.com/product_details/2591/One_Percenter_Coin/

Love, Respect, and Ride Safe,

ArtBiker

Disclaimer:  For anyone new to the motorcycle scene that might be reading my blog, please be aware that members of the 1%er communities take their patches, colors, and 1% designation very seriously.  You do not want to unknowingly wear or display something that could lead to a very real confrontation.  I have posted on this topic in the past and invite you to learn a bit more about the biker culture before innocently buying into something that could end badly.

Australia's Biker Problem Update

 Motorcycle Club, Outlaw Biker  Comments Off on Australia's Biker Problem Update
Mar 252009
 

In Sydney, police arrested a sergeant-at-arms of the Bandidos motorcycle club after a series of shootings in the city’s south-west as authorities launched a crackdown on biker groups in response to the deadly airport brawl that shocked the country and brought a simmering club war out into the open.

Officials are calling for a uniformed, hard-line set of laws across the country to police the outlaw motorcycle clubs including confiscating the proceeds of club-related crime, limiting the freedom of movement of former club members, including who they may contact and which premises they may visit, and banning former club members from employment in high-risk industries.

The South Australian Serious and Organized Crime Act of 2008, allows the government to declare biker clubs to be prohibited criminal groups, and police to arrest their members for criminal association.  New South Wales is considering adopting the act, however motorcycle clubs have threatened a High Court challenge to the laws.  NSW Premier Nathan Rees said, “I don’t want to introduce laws that are subsequently thrown out by the High Court,” Mr. Rees said he hoped to see a draft of the laws next week, and planned to introduce the legislation during this session of parliament.

Dr Andreas Schloenhardt, Associate Professor at The University of Queensland TC Beirne School of Law, said that the call for the introduction of South Australia’s now infamous Serious and Organized Crime Act to other States is not the solution.  He said a carefully developed and meaningful response to organized crime in Australia was needed instead.

“By adopting the South Australian Act, there is little that can stop the Attorney-General from banning a local bowling club or the opposition party if he feels they pose a public safety risk.  The legislation has inadequate review mechanisms. A better response would be one that aims at the key directors and financiers of criminal organizations and targets the wealth accumulated from drug trafficking, migrant smuggling, trafficking in persons, loan sharking, and other types of organized crime. The Canadian Criminal Code provisions and the US RICO laws provide good examples.”

The current legislation allows the Attorney General to declare ‘a criminal biker club an outlaw organization’ on the basis of police intelligence and hold ‘club members who engage in acts of violence that threaten and intimidate the public’ liable for serious offences.

The fears of a biker invasion come as Prime Minister Kevin Rudd declared “zero tolerance” of biker crime.  Proposals to introduce similar laws in Queensland in 2007 failed. Other States fear that the heavy-handed approach may lead some criminal organizations to go further underground and/or relocate across the border.  Police fear Sydney’s bloody biker war will spread to the Gold Coast as club members flee the battle and a promised police crackdown.

Tensions are already high on the Gold Coast after a Fink was shot and taken to Gold Coast Hospital on Friday – but police have refused to reveal the circumstances surrounding the attack.

Another Fink was last week dragged screaming from Southport Magistrates Court after threatening a magistrate who sentenced him to jail.

With rumors the Hells Angels are planning to challenge for control of the city by opening a Gold Coast chapter, police fear the Sydney club war will spill across the border, the Gold Coast Bulletin reports.

If they come here, we are stuffed,” said one officer.  “The bikers already control this town – the last thing we need is to become a haven for bikers fleeing the laws in South Australia and war in Sydney.  If NSW does toughen up the laws, it will be bad for Queensland. Where else do you think they would go?”

The concern over the South Australian laws has led the federal government to conduct a parliamentary inquiry into anti-organized crime laws. Findings from this report are expected later this year. 

Bikers Against Child Abuse

 Motorcycle Club, Outlaw Biker  Comments Off on Bikers Against Child Abuse
Mar 092009
 

 

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Bikers Against Child Abuse (B.A.C.A.), has been in the news lately.  Unfortunately, part of this is due to the loss of a Brother.  The media picked up on the story once they saw 100+ bikes and 900+ attendees escorting fallen brother Gerald “Jester” Cleveland II (33) to his final resting place in Arlington, Texas.  Jester was a former Fort Worth Chapter President and was currently sitting as the State Vice President of the organization.

B.A.C.A. is a fantastic organization that was born in Utah in 1995. The group “exists to provide aid, comfort, safety, and support for children that have been sexually, physically, and emotionally abused.”  Not only do funds raised by the club help to pay for necessary therapy, but “BACA also provides for the children by attending court proceedings and parole hearings with them, escorting them to and from school or errands if necessary, and many other ways to insure that the children are free from fear and can return to their previous level of adaptive functioning.”

Children are actually “adopted” by the club and become part of the biker family.  The brotherhood that is shared by patch members extends to these youngsters to give them a sense of security, family, and safety.  Members treat the children just like a brother and are willing to go to extreme lengths to protect them.

If you are interested in becoming involved, they are always looking for a few good men and women.  In order to be a full member, you will go through a thorough background check as well as committing to attend at least 80% of the activities for the first year.  Once you get through that, membership is up to vote.  For more info, to become involved, or just to make a donation, please look them up at www.bacausa.com

 

Love, Respect, and Ride Safe,

ArtBiker