May 282009
 

I remember my dad sitting on the back porch of our home in Albuquerque, New Mexico.  The cool, clear night’s calm would be broken only by the screaming engines of the kids on crotch rockets racing down the streets near our house.  He would ask me if I rode like that, and I would say no… I really didn’t.  I didn’t have a crotch rocket for one, and the bike I had wouldn’t make the power those rockets made.  But, he would give me a little nod as I grabbed my leathers and told him I was heading out to see the boys.  My Mom would always yell at me in the driveway to put on the helmet and not just stick it in a saddlebag.

I also remember reading an article about the life expectancy of a non-trained and new rider who gets onto a crotch rocket.  An inexperienced rider was expected to live five days.  Damn, that is pretty harsh. 

I fully endorse a rider’s safety course and think you are an idiot to start riding without taking one.  That being said, I also believe that no one should be able to tell me to fasten my seatbelt, wear a helmet, or do anything that would basically be deemed a “victimless” crime where my personal stupidity hurts no one (physically or monetarily) other than myself.  Of course, if something happened to me, my family would suffer, that should make me think twice… but I still stand by my earlier statement that no one should be able to force me.  So, with this in mind, I am passing on an article about mandatory safety courses for sport bike riders in the state of Texas.  Once again, while I think everyone should, I don’t think there should be a law.

 

Love, Respect, and Ride Safe,

ArtBiker

  

EL PASO, Texas — In 2006, Myles Anderson, 20, of El Paso crashed his Suzuki motorcycle into a car as traffic slowed on I-10 East. The collision killed him. His parents believe education could have made a difference. Their story led to the development of HB 4531.

The bill would require those buying high-performance motorcycles take a training course within six months of the purchase.

“They shouldn’t even be allowed to buy a bike unless they take classes for that,” said Ivana Torres, of East El Paso.

Torres supports the proposed legislation because two of her friends were recently involved in a deadly motorcycle crash.

“I know they were riding down Transmountain, and I know he didn’t know how to maneuver the bike right,” said Torres. “And it slipped out, and the girl fell out. She instantly died.”

Those behind the bill hope it will slow the rise in motorcycle deaths. The numbers nationwide are up 8 percent, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s Fatality Analysis Reporting System. And in Texas, motorcycle fatalities make up 12 percent of all motor vehicle deaths in the state.

“I just think that most people, a lot of people, don’t really understand the differences, the challenges associated with riding a motorcycle versus a car,” said Eric Safford, of East El Paso. “And there’s a lot less safety on a motorcycle because you’re not enclosed. So I think it’s a good idea.”

With motorcycle training required, some said they would feel more comfortable sharing the road with bikers.

“It would be for my safety and the safety of others as well,” said Karla Perez, of East El Paso.

“You know it’s not just about them,” said Sifford. “There’s other people on the road, as well as other motorcyclists.”

If the bill becomes law, the motorcycle owner must show proof of course attendance upon the request of law enforcement. Violators would be fined between $500 and $1,000.

 

Weekend Pass : Another Noise Ordinance

 Motorcycle Rally, Weekend Pass : Biker's Rights and the Law  Comments Off on Weekend Pass : Another Noise Ordinance
Jan 222009
 

It seems to be happening all over the country and it has been affecting major motorcycle rallies for some time… What, you may ask?  Well, if you can hear me over your straight pipes, the noise is the problem.  Daytona, the now defunct Myrtle Beach, heck, even Sturgis have been more aggressive in their fight with noise pollution caused by motorcycles.  And now it seems that Laconia is about to fight the good fight.

Wednesday saw a public hearing about a bill sponsored by State Representative Judith Day of North Hampton.  Evidently, she got 1,000 voters to sign a petition asking that stronger limits on motorcycle noise be implemented in the state of New Hampshire.  The proposed bill asks that the allowable decibel level be dropped to 99 from 106.  The bill also asks that fines be increased from a $300 max to $1,000.

Luckily for us, about 120 people showed up at the public hearing to oppose the bill and express concerns that the bill would not only cost bikers and shops a ton of cash to get their bikes into compliance, but could very well harm the attendance of the Laconia Rally.  This event brings major funds to the Lakes Region and many businesses are understandably concerned.

Keep up the good fight, write your congressmen and representatives, and keep your bike the way you like it…. Loud!

 

Love, Respect, and Ride Safe,

ArtBiker