Oct 202010
 

Today is the day when the trial of five Outlaws, including the national president, is to begin in Richmond’s federal court in Richmond. An additional six bikers will be tried starting Dec. 1.

You  may recall that more than two dozen members of the Outlaws and Pagans motorcycle clubs were arrested last June in Maine, Montana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Wisconsin.  They have been charged in the indictment that alleged the Outlaws moved into Virginia in 2006 when it opened the Manassas chapter, with plans to expand in the state and battle with the Hells Angels in the Richmond area.

The 50-page indictment alleges the Outlaws ran a long-term criminal enterprise that involved attempted murder, kidnapping, assault, robbery, extortion, witness intimidation, drug distribution, illegal gambling, weapons offenses, and a civil-rights violation.

Authorities say that in February, Outlaws members discussed plans to blow up a Richmond tattoo shop owned by a Hells Angels member, and that in March, undercover agents who infiltrated the gang were instructed on how to make several types of explosives for killing Hells Angels in the Richmond area.

Last Wednesday, Mark “Snuff” Steven Fiel, president of the Outlaws’ Manassas and Shenandoah Valley Chapter, plead guilty to a charge of conspiracy to violate federal racketeering law. He was the 14th person to sign a plea deal and faces up to 20 years in prison when he is sentenced in January. Fiel will forfeit his 2005 Harley-Davidson, but his agreement does not require him to rat on other club members. Plea deals often call for cooperation with authorities, although the lack of such a provision does not bar someone from snitching.

Feil’s son, Mark Jason Fiel, 37, a former Outlaw, is set to be tried Dec. 1. He and club member Christopher Timbers, 37, are charged with violating the civil rights of a black man beaten because of his race in Fredericksburg in 2008. The civil-rights charges will be tried separately.

Jack “Milwaukee Jack” Rosga, 53, of Wisconsin, the Outlaws’ National President, is among those set to be tried today on charges of racketeering and conspiracy to commit violence in the aid of racketeering.

The others on trial today are:

• William “Rebel” Davey, 46, a former chapter enforcer in North Carolina;

• Thomas “Jo Jo” Petrini, 48, a former Outlaws member in the Manassas chapter;

• Mark “Lytnin'” Spradling, 52, treasurer of the club region that includes Virginia and both Carolinas

• Leslie Werth, 47, vice president of a South Carolina chapter.

In addition to the racketeering and conspiracy charges, Davey and Werth are accused of violence in the aid of racketeering and firearms offenses.

One of those indicted will not be tried — Thomas “Tomcat” Mayne, 59, was shot to death June 15 in Maine when authorities tried to arrest him the day the charges were made public.

Three Richmond-area members of the Pagans, who allegedly allied themselves with the Outlaws, also were indicted: Charles Love, 49, of Amelia County; and Charles Barlow, 43, and Dennis Haldermann, 45, both of Chester.  Barlow and Love have pleaded guilty, while Haldermann will be tried Dec. 1 on a charge of committing violence in the aid of racketeering.