Jun 242009
 

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Yes, you too can tell the Citizens of society to F-Off by proudly displaying your own 1%er/FTW medallion!  This coin has been created by the Northwestern Territorial Mint for ANYONE to purchase… Yes, you can proudly display this in your home with absolutely nothing to back it up!  Who needs the hassle of prospecting for months or years to prove your mettle when, for only .50, you can own one of these fine tokens of your 1%er mentality…  The following comes straight from the website:

“Trouble was caused by the one percent deviant that tarnishes the public image of both motorcycles and motorcyclists.” – American Motorcycle Association, responding to the Hollister Motorcycle Rally in 1947.

The most feared and respected riders roaming the blacktop, one percenters are a breed apart from all others. These individuals bow to no one, test the boundaries of all and give their devotion to few.  The 1%er insignia is worn with pride by those who choose not to settle, not to give in to polite society but instead ride with the wind in their face and their back to the status quo.

How do you become a one percenter? If you have to ask the question, you won’t understand the answer. Only another one percenter can truly understand what belonging takes. These riders find freedom in the style they see fit and apologizing to no one for it. A brotherhood on two wheels, a bold way of life – a one percenter is the ultimate expression of liberty.

This coin is diamond-shaped, reflecting the “one-percenter” design that the select clubs use to show their allegiance to their club. Against a pitch-black backdrop, the reverse features a grinning skull above the letters “FTW” – shorthand for a take-no-prisoner worldview commonly held among club members. The obverse shows the “1%er” text. Minted in a nickel alloy, this coin is imbued with ebony enamel on both sides.

Might as well buy two or three of these.  And if you are interested, you can get some cool accessories like a small carrying pouch (in blue, burgundy, or black), or a hip acrylic stand!  The coins start shipping the first of July and I would suggest getting yours on order now to be sure you have one or two in place in time for the second season of Sons of Anarchy to air.

http://store.nwtmint.com/product_details/2591/One_Percenter_Coin/

Love, Respect, and Ride Safe,

ArtBiker

Disclaimer:  For anyone new to the motorcycle scene that might be reading my blog, please be aware that members of the 1%er communities take their patches, colors, and 1% designation very seriously.  You do not want to unknowingly wear or display something that could lead to a very real confrontation.  I have posted on this topic in the past and invite you to learn a bit more about the biker culture before innocently buying into something that could end badly.

American Motorcycle Culture : the one percenters

 Biker News, Outlaw Biker, Uncategorized  Comments Off on American Motorcycle Culture : the one percenters
Jan 222009
 

This story just came out in the Salem News… I think it is a good showing of just how misunderstood the citizen community can be about the club lifestyle.  As someone who bridges the gap between academia and the subculture that is the biker world, I find it appalling that educators would make such a gross mistake.  Maybe they need to check out this blog!

 

Love, Respect, and Ride Safe,

ArtBiker

 

Salem-News.com (Jan-22-2009)

American Motorcycle Culture: The One Percenters

Tim King Salem-News.com

One Percent of all Motorcyclists were deemed “outlaw” by the AMA after the “Hollister Riot” in 1947; the patch has a unique meaning.

 one_percent_mod

Above: The One-Percenter patch designates a certain position in the world of bikers; this is not awarded for Murder or crime committed on behalf of the motorcycle club.
In the located photos below this article: News reporter
Tim King, employed by KATU Channel-2 News in Portland, Oregon at the time, rides the chopped Harley down the street in Keizer, Oregon.
Photo: Gypsy Joker MC Club

 

(SALEM, Ore.) – A friend of mine who is the President of a local motorcycle club chapter, explained this week that a college criminology course in Salem, Oregon is teaching students false information about the history of bikers and motorcycle clubs.

1232608418Marlon Brando in ‘Wild One'”Tattoo Mike” of the Gypsy Joker club in Salem, says he was frustrated to discover that the college professor was telling students that the 1% patch on the back of club jackets means that the biker has murdered for his club.

That explanation is purely fictitious, and not even close to the actual meaning of what “One Percenter” means.

Did you ever see the movie The Wild One with Marlon Brando?

The tale was inspired and loosely based on a real-life incident that took place over the Fourth of July weekend in 1947 in Hollister, California. Now known as the “Hollister Riot”, the event gained national attention as it was the focus of a Harper’s Magazine article in January 1951 article titled, “The Cyclists’ Raid” by Frank Rooney.

On that weekend, about four thousand motorcyclists and other visitors and enthusiasts, roared into the town over a two day period, and overwhelmed the facilities, according to filmsite.org.

The movie made the 4th of July event appear to be much more significant than it actually was, according to most reports. In reality, the town was not ransacked, the women were not accosted, and they did not cause a great deal of civil unrest.

 

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Scene from Hollister in 1947, that manysay was actually staged for the camera.Photo: Chronicle/Barney Peterson

 

The press apparently couldn’t resist the opportunity to play Hollister for all it was worth. Wikipedia states that “Several newspaper articles were written that, according to some attendees, sensationalized the event and Life magazine ran an article and a staged photograph of an intoxicated subject on a motorcycle parked in a bar.”

This movie actually may have inspired a movement, as other films depicting bikers soon started showing up in theaters, making the hearts of little old ladies grow faint in fear. Soon black leather jackets soared along with Harley Davidson sales.

And this led to the press asking the “respectable” motorcycle group, the American Motorcycle Assiciation (AMA) to comment on the Hollister incident.

The AMA responded by saying that 99% if all motorcyclists were law-abiding citizens, and the last one percent were outlaws.

That, is when and where the term “1%” came into being, and it was practically an invitation to would-be outlaw bikers to embrace the term, thanks to the AMA.

So if you ever hear someone tell you that the 1% patch means anything else, you straighten them out and tell them the story of Hollister and the AMA.

 

Charity Work

I met Tattoo Mike when he and other club members were doing a Christmas Toy Run in 2002. I commented on Mike’s chopper being especially cool and he said, “You want to ride it?”

He looked a little surprised as I took his helmet, fired up the chopped Harley with 22″ apehanger handlebars and a suicide clutch, and took off down the street. I had never ridden a bike with a suicide clutch in my life up to that point, but I had asked enough questions of my Harley friends over the years to pull it off.

He tells me the Gypsy Joker club members still laugh about it; apparently Mike had offered the chance to ride it to several news reporters over the years, and they always declined. He says he had no idea I would jump on it and take off.

I know people in this group who are really decent, and while biker’s club patches may be unwelcome in many places, and loud bikes tend to scare people, I see the better side of them, probably because my dad was a serious motorcycle enthusiast.

To give you an example, one of his last projects was the restoration of a 1913 Harley Davidson. His big, bearded, leather-clad friends who would visit on big chrome choppers were the nicest people you could ever meet. My dad was old school “Mr. Establishment”, but Harleys are a universal language that crosses every boundary.

I hate to hear that professors in our local college system are so misinformed that they would actually try to rewrite a historical event and meaning of a symbol that any biker could explain, if that professor or the people who create their cirriculum, took the time to ask.

This site has a more detailed history on Hollister and the one percenter story: roadratroberts1.bravepages.com/What_The_Hell_is_1%25.htm


Here are photos taken by members of the Salem Gypsy Joker MC Club, of me riding Mike’s old school chopper during their annual Christmas Toy Run:

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Dec 272008
 

The government, the economy, and even some communities all seem to have it out for our fun and us.  This past week held a few important announcements concerning various motorcycle events around the country.

First, Myrtle Beach is still in the news with the second attempt to curtail new laws against biker fun falling short of the anticipated victory. U.S. District Court Judge Terry Wooten denied a request for an injunction filed by Harley-Davidson of Myrtle Beach and Mike Shank, MB Bike week promoter.  As it stands, the new helmet law and sound ordinance are still going to take affect, as well as new laws that seem to restrict interstate commerce based on the fact that most vendors are from out of the South Carolina area.  There are still two lawsuits on the table against the city of Myrtle Beach and those suits have yet to be decided.  If you want or need more background info on what is going on, please see my earlier posts under the bike rallies section.

American Honda has pulled out of AMA road racing for lack of funds and has now pulled the plug on the Honda Hoot.  This Honda centric rally held in Ashville, NC and later in Knoxville, TN, has seen a quarter million guests over its 15 years of fun.  It is sad to think that our economy is that far-gone, but perhaps it will be back when things turn around.

The Fourth Annual Legend of the Motorcycle, Concours d’Elegance, has also been affected by the economy.  Rather than letting the event run at half mast because of the hard times the sponsors are having, the folks who organize this event have decided to postpone the celebration until 2010. 

“We’d never do anything to compromise the quality of the Concours,” says event co-founder Jared Zaugg. “We’d rather suspend the event than see it done halfway and I’m sure those who have participated would agree. This has been a true labor of love and something we strongly believe in, so we look forward to reinstating it after this hiatus.”

Lastly, I had promised an update on the Hollister Rally, and it seems the update is not all that good.  As you may recall, the event was cancelled in 2007 and came back in 2008.  However, the city claims to have lost 125 grand at that year’s rally.  If you look at the published statistics, this money went to a HUGE influx of police and security.  Cops were called in from all over the area and all local officers who wanted overtime were allowed to work the event.  As it turns out, the bikers were not an unruly group and the amount brought in from tickets and arrests weren’t nearly enough to substantiate the presence of Johnny Law.  Anyway, the city of Hollister wants the $365,000 price tag of the rally to be paid up front to ensure that they don’t get burned again and that’s just not going to happen.  So, Hollister 2009 is officially cancelled.  Now, does that mean we don’t show up?  I never said that… it just means that the event is not on the city’s calendar.

 

Love, Respect, and Ride Safe,

ArtBiker