More Cincinnati News and Lichter’s Upcoming Exhibit

 Motorcycle Industry News, Press Release  Comments Off on More Cincinnati News and Lichter’s Upcoming Exhibit
Feb 192010
 

You may have seen my recent post about the V-Twin Expo in Cincinnati.  I told you a bit about the winners of the V-Twin Awards and let you know that, despite weather and economic conditions, the show was its usual success.  I had friends there that said it was a fantastic time.

Well, I just got this press release in the mail that tells a bit about a round table discussion that took place during the event.  I sure wish I were able to attend.  I would have loved to hear what everyone had to say.  Again, maybe next year.

L&R,

ArtBiker

Press Release:

Despite having to make their annual voyage through wintery conditions that nearly shut down the entire East coast, a barrage of V-Twin dealers and exhibitors trekked their way to the 10th Annual V-Twin Expo in Cincinnati the weekend of February 6-8. The industry’s premier trade show, the V-Twin Expo is an opportunity for dealers and manufacturers to strike a deal and ascertain the overall state of the industry from veterans and colleagues. In addition to browsing an impressive array of V-Twin parts and accessories, this year’s expo also featured the “Eternal Combustion-Opportunity in the Wind” seminar.

Sponsored by the Legendary Buffalo Chip and Hot Leathers, this round table gave audience members the chance to converse, listen and learn from an impressive selection of successful and established bike builders and discuss the current climate of the V-Twin industry.

Turn out for the seminar was remarkable as an impressive assortment of industry giants discussed how they have managed to capitalize on their passion within the current climate and how they have successfully turned difficulty into opportunity. The seminar was moderated by celebrated motorcycle photographer, Michael Lichter and the panel consisted of industry notables Kevin Baas, Bryan Fuller, Brian Klock, Gary Mauer, Dave Perewitz, Matt Olsen, Kirk Taylor and Paul Yaffe. An overwhelming sense of passion for the industry permeated the room while journalists, industry insiders, dealers, manufacturers and builders discussed the industry; how it has changed since starting out, how to adapt to these changes and refocus business as well as how to pass this passion down to the next generation of bike builders.

At the conclusion of the seminar celebrity moderator, Michael Lichter also revealed the theme, participants and the logo, designed by Hot Leathers, for the 10th annual Motorcycle as Art exhibit to be displayed at the Legendary Buffalo Chip August 7-13. Titled “Eternal Combustion- 30 in the Wind” this year’s exhibit will focus on the explosion of interest and passion for custom motorcycles seen over the last thirty years. The display will include 30 custom motorcycles from 15 pairs of custom builders and will feature the photography and limited edition prints of the renowned photographer. This internationally renowned and highly anticipated yearly exhibit will be on display at the Lichter Exhibition Hall on the grounds of the Legendary Buffalo Chip August 7-13. An opportunity to peruse, mingle, discuss and learn this year’s V-Twin Expo and highly anticipated “Eternal Combustion-Opportunity in the Wind” seminar was the perfect opportunity for those involved in the V-Twin industry to rekindle their passion for the business and introduce this years Motorcycles as Art exhibition.

More information on the free Motorcycles as Art 2010 Exhibition, “Eternal Combustion-30 in the Wind” is available at motorcyclesasart.com and buffalochip.com.

May 082009
 

Yup, there I was, just minding my own business, when out of no-where, internationally acclaimed motorcycle photographer, Michael Lichter, had me in his sights.  Ok, so we really spent the day running around Louisiana with a few of the Limpnickie Lot Kids, taking pictures, and enjoying a Plantation Poker Run.  

However, it is true that the great Mr. Lichter shot my image and I hope to see what he captured.  And, in addition, Cyril Huze decided to take my camera and photograph me as well.  I don’t know, maybe it is the hair, but everyone seems to want my picture (sarcasm).  

Cyril had me sit on BrewMamma’s new Flathead for a quick pic.  Boy, did that ever get her out of her seat!  I approached the bike and she jumped up and was practically running over to see what was going on.  Cyril, in his best French manner, told her to get out of the shot and let him do his work.  You gotta love the French (sarcasm).

 

Photo by Cyril Huze

Photo by Cyril Huze

 

 

Anyway, shot by two of the industries leaders… all in all a good day.  I am now “recovering” and going through a few of the pics I shot here in New Orleans.  It appears that I have enjoyed myself.  I will post more of them soon.  At the moment, I am thinking of heading back to Texas tomorrow to surprise the Ol’ Lady for Mother’s Day.  Good thing she never reads my blog.

 

L&R,

ArtBiker

 

 

Let the rumors begin... Cyril and Marilyn... Inquiring minds want to know

Let the rumors begin... Cyril and Marilyn... Inquiring minds want to know

Dec 262008
 

img_01291

 

I apologize for the long delay with my thoughts about the Lone Star Rally… it was only a week ago but it feels like it has been months.  How was it?  Actually, it wasn’t bad at all.  The island had been ripped apart which set the rally back a month or so, but everything seemed to come together. 

Saturday morning I geared up and headed to the meeting point to join up with the boys in the club.  Baller showed up on his King, but the old girl started to make an awful noise.  Sounded to me like a lifter, but he thought it was probably a bearing.  He called a Brother and headed out to swap bikes for the day (the problem did turn out to be a lifter, but it really doesn’t matter).  About ten other guys from the club showed and we all headed down to road to meet up with Rubio and Baller on his borrowed ride.  

By this time we had picked up a few stragglers and were about 18 bikes strong.  We rolled onto the island and I quickly noticed the steep prices for parking.  Folks in a cage were paying up to $40 for a parking space!  Now, the island is still a mess from the hurricane and the businesses there desperately need the influx of monies to get back on their feet, but $40 is a bit unconscionable. 

We found our way into a private party where the gumbo, beer, and margaritas were free.  We sipped the frozen drinks in quiet homage to the first margarita ever made.  The drink was invented a mile or so from where we stood at the Balinese Room which was destroyed during hurricane Ike.  The quiet didn’t last too long, however, you see the drinks were free.  Next thing you know our crew is friggin legless and crawling around the island looking at all the vendors and checking out the bikes.  The place was pretty packed and, from what I was told, Saturday’s showing was larger than Friday’s.  That seems par for the course for me.


img_00561

I did see a few cool rides and a few folks I hadn’t seen in a while.  For example, this badass quad with a v-twin power plant, I have been hitting rallies since the late 80’s and have never seen a set up like this one before.  There was also a really sweet trike cruising the strand.


img_0039

Sunday I returned to the rally with my youngest daughter.  Her older sister has been going to rallies with me since she was about two months old, and this was her second time to this rally in her short one and a half year life.  We always have a good time together and I try to take the girls to locations during times when the rally is calm.  Not because I am worried about her at all, but I understand that a lot of us are out to have a good time and don’t necessarily want to have to dodge a stroller on our vacation.  Sunday was perfect as the place was really dead.  I think the Saturday festivities went on far longer than I stayed.  I imagine everyone was still in a campsite, hotel room, or on the beach nursing a serious hangover.

Xaiden and I strolled down the empty strand, checking out the bikes and just hanging out together.  You will never guess who we ran into… Michael Lichter.  For those of you who don’t know him, he is the man most likely responsible for all those custom bike photos you drool over in the garage.  Lichter has been photographing for Easyriders Magazine since the magazine was fairly new and he has been putting on some amazing exhibitions of photos and bikes during the Sturgis Rally since 2000 or so.  You need to check out his website at: www.lichterphoto.com.  Anyway, He was shooting a model on a bike for the Easyriders Catalog.  We stopped by and said hello.  He was using a sweet new Nikon camera that has not even been released yet, and his poor model had a broken leg.  I am willing to bet you won’t see that in the catalog shots.


img_0138

 

We left Michael to do his work and made another pass down the strand.  Then we sat for a while and watched the people slowly trickle into the streets as the vendors awoke and the engines came to life.  Before we knew it, we were heading back to Houston to have lunch and call it a day.

The Lone Star Rally is always a good time, it is a free event (if you don’t park in a lot), a ton of people show up, drinks are cheap for a rally (about $3 for a 16oz beer), and the weather is always good. No, you don’t have the beautiful waters of Daytona, you don’t have the amazing riding of Sturgis, you don’t have the gorgeous landscape of Laconia, and you don’t even have the tourist attractions of Myrtle Beach; but, the rally is always worth it, good friends, good food, good drink, and a good excuse to get out and be together.  Come out next year and say hello… You can find me in a gutter on Saturday, or pushing a stroller down the strand at some ungodly hour on Sunday.

 

Love, Respect, and Ride Safe,

ArtBiker

 1215_loc_ls-rally31

Father, daughter enjoy Lone Star Rally

Xaiden Linton does a wheelie in her stroller as her father, Matt Linton, pushes her down The Strand to see the motorcycles Sunday on the final day of the Lone Star Rally.

Dec 262008
 

img_01291

 

I apologize for the long delay with my thoughts about the Lone Star Rally… it was only a week ago but it feels like it has been months.  How was it?  Actually, it wasn’t bad at all.  The island had been ripped apart which set the rally back a month or so, but everything seemed to come together. 

Saturday morning I geared up and headed to the meeting point to join up with the boys in the club.  Baller showed up on his King, but the old girl started to make an awful noise.  Sounded to me like a lifter, but he thought it was probably a bearing.  He called a Brother and headed out to swap bikes for the day (the problem did turn out to be a lifter, but it really doesn’t matter).  About ten other guys from the club showed and we all headed down to road to meet up with Rubio and Baller on his borrowed ride.  

By this time we had picked up a few stragglers and were about 18 bikes strong.  We rolled onto the island and I quickly noticed the steep prices for parking.  Folks in a cage were paying up to $40 for a parking space!  Now, the island is still a mess from the hurricane and the businesses there desperately need the influx of monies to get back on their feet, but $40 is a bit unconscionable. 

We found our way into a private party where the gumbo, beer, and margaritas were free.  We sipped the frozen drinks in quiet homage to the first margarita ever made.  The drink was invented a mile or so from where we stood at the Balinese Room which was destroyed during hurricane Ike.  The quiet didn’t last too long, however, you see the drinks were free.  Next thing you know our crew is friggin legless and crawling around the island looking at all the vendors and checking out the bikes.  The place was pretty packed and, from what I was told, Saturday’s showing was larger than Friday’s.  That seems par for the course for me.


img_00561

I did see a few cool rides and a few folks I hadn’t seen in a while.  For example, this badass quad with a v-twin power plant, I have been hitting rallies since the late 80’s and have never seen a set up like this one before.  There was also a really sweet trike cruising the strand.


img_0039

Sunday I returned to the rally with my youngest daughter.  Her older sister has been going to rallies with me since she was about two months old, and this was her second time to this rally in her short one and a half year life.  We always have a good time together and I try to take the girls to locations during times when the rally is calm.  Not because I am worried about her at all, but I understand that a lot of us are out to have a good time and don’t necessarily want to have to dodge a stroller on our vacation.  Sunday was perfect as the place was really dead.  I think the Saturday festivities went on far longer than I stayed.  I imagine everyone was still in a campsite, hotel room, or on the beach nursing a serious hangover.

Xaiden and I strolled down the empty strand, checking out the bikes and just hanging out together.  You will never guess who we ran into… Michael Lichter.  For those of you who don’t know him, he is the man most likely responsible for all those custom bike photos you drool over in the garage.  Lichter has been photographing for Easyriders Magazine since the magazine was fairly new and he has been putting on some amazing exhibitions of photos and bikes during the Sturgis Rally since 2000 or so.  You need to check out his website at: www.lichterphoto.com.  Anyway, He was shooting a model on a bike for the Easyriders Catalog.  We stopped by and said hello.  He was using a sweet new Nikon camera that has not even been released yet, and his poor model had a broken leg.  I am willing to bet you won’t see that in the catalog shots.


img_0138

 

We left Michael to do his work and made another pass down the strand.  Then we sat for a while and watched the people slowly trickle into the streets as the vendors awoke and the engines came to life.  Before we knew it, we were heading back to Houston to have lunch and call it a day.

The Lone Star Rally is always a good time, it is a free event (if you don’t park in a lot), a ton of people show up, drinks are cheap for a rally (about $3 for a 16oz beer), and the weather is always good. No, you don’t have the beautiful waters of Daytona, you don’t have the amazing riding of Sturgis, you don’t have the gorgeous landscape of Laconia, and you don’t even have the tourist attractions of Myrtle Beach; but, the rally is always worth it, good friends, good food, good drink, and a good excuse to get out and be together.  Come out next year and say hello… You can find me in a gutter on Saturday, or pushing a stroller down the strand at some ungodly hour on Sunday.

 

Love, Respect, and Ride Safe,

ArtBiker

 1215_loc_ls-rally31

Father, daughter enjoy Lone Star Rally

Xaiden Linton does a wheelie in her stroller as her father, Matt Linton, pushes her down The Strand to see the motorcycles Sunday on the final day of the Lone Star Rally.