Oct 202010
 

Today is the day when the trial of five Outlaws, including the national president, is to begin in Richmond’s federal court in Richmond. An additional six bikers will be tried starting Dec. 1.

You  may recall that more than two dozen members of the Outlaws and Pagans motorcycle clubs were arrested last June in Maine, Montana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Wisconsin.  They have been charged in the indictment that alleged the Outlaws moved into Virginia in 2006 when it opened the Manassas chapter, with plans to expand in the state and battle with the Hells Angels in the Richmond area.

The 50-page indictment alleges the Outlaws ran a long-term criminal enterprise that involved attempted murder, kidnapping, assault, robbery, extortion, witness intimidation, drug distribution, illegal gambling, weapons offenses, and a civil-rights violation.

Authorities say that in February, Outlaws members discussed plans to blow up a Richmond tattoo shop owned by a Hells Angels member, and that in March, undercover agents who infiltrated the gang were instructed on how to make several types of explosives for killing Hells Angels in the Richmond area.

Last Wednesday, Mark “Snuff” Steven Fiel, president of the Outlaws’ Manassas and Shenandoah Valley Chapter, plead guilty to a charge of conspiracy to violate federal racketeering law. He was the 14th person to sign a plea deal and faces up to 20 years in prison when he is sentenced in January. Fiel will forfeit his 2005 Harley-Davidson, but his agreement does not require him to rat on other club members. Plea deals often call for cooperation with authorities, although the lack of such a provision does not bar someone from snitching.

Feil’s son, Mark Jason Fiel, 37, a former Outlaw, is set to be tried Dec. 1. He and club member Christopher Timbers, 37, are charged with violating the civil rights of a black man beaten because of his race in Fredericksburg in 2008. The civil-rights charges will be tried separately.

Jack “Milwaukee Jack” Rosga, 53, of Wisconsin, the Outlaws’ National President, is among those set to be tried today on charges of racketeering and conspiracy to commit violence in the aid of racketeering.

The others on trial today are:

• William “Rebel” Davey, 46, a former chapter enforcer in North Carolina;

• Thomas “Jo Jo” Petrini, 48, a former Outlaws member in the Manassas chapter;

• Mark “Lytnin’” Spradling, 52, treasurer of the club region that includes Virginia and both Carolinas

• Leslie Werth, 47, vice president of a South Carolina chapter.

In addition to the racketeering and conspiracy charges, Davey and Werth are accused of violence in the aid of racketeering and firearms offenses.

One of those indicted will not be tried — Thomas “Tomcat” Mayne, 59, was shot to death June 15 in Maine when authorities tried to arrest him the day the charges were made public.

Three Richmond-area members of the Pagans, who allegedly allied themselves with the Outlaws, also were indicted: Charles Love, 49, of Amelia County; and Charles Barlow, 43, and Dennis Haldermann, 45, both of Chester.  Barlow and Love have pleaded guilty, while Haldermann will be tried Dec. 1 on a charge of committing violence in the aid of racketeering.

Jul 012010
 

RICHMOND – It took more than an hour, but more than two dozen men appeared in U.S. District Federal Court in Richmond yesterday to be arraigned on a variety of charges related to outlaw motorcycle gxxx activity in the region.

The men – standing before the judge one at a time, and being led into the courtroom in small groups – included Jack “Milwaukee Jack” Rosga – whom federal officials in indictments described as the group’s national president and two local men Charles “Chuck” Barlow, 43, and Dennis “Chew Chew” Haldermann, 45 both from Chesterfield.

Barlow and Haldermann were listed in the indictments as alleged members of the allied Pagans Motorcycle Club. According to a federal indictment, the biker gxxx operated in Petersburg.

Halderman n was charged in count three of the indictment – violent crimes in aid of racketeering activity. The indictment charges nine others with this offense, which involves an alleged assault against the Desparados Motorcycle Gxxx on or about March 14, 2009. The maximum penalty is 20 years in prison.

Haldermann was one of two that appeared in court yesterday in civilian clothes instead of a prison jumpsuit because he is free on bond.

According to the indictments, Outlaws and Pagans members set a trap and assaulted rival Hell’s Angels and Desperados Motorcycle Club members at “Cockade Bar” – later confirmed by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Virginia to be Cockade City Grill.

On March 14, 2009, three members went into the bar in “colors” – a vest signifying membership in the club. One man stood outside the bar in colors as a lure, while three other Outlaws members were waiting inside without the vests. Several others waited outside to trap rival bikers inside the bar, where they were assaulted.

The fight spilled into the parking lot, where guns were drawn. Local police arrived and ended the standoff, the indictment says. They seized a knife and brass knuckles from one Outlaws member.

Federal District Judge Henry Hudson warned Haldermann that he must abide by the release agreement and meet the next court date.

Barlow was also one of the 10 charged with violent crimes in aid of racketeering activity for his alleged role in the assault against the Desperados Motorcycle Gxxx in March 2009.

Petersburg appears to be at the center of much of the activity of the Outlaws outlined in the indictment.

The indictment says that in July of last year, Rosga ordered a crowd of Outlaws at the Petersburg Clubhouse to shoot Hell’s Angels and other rivals.

In October, members meeting at the Petersburg Clubhouse discussed assaulting Hell’s Angels over a recent attack in Florida that sent two Outlaws to the hospital. Following a shooting attack of a Hell’s Angel in Maine, a member asked about staying at the Petersburg Clubhouse to avoid attention up north.

As recently as February of this year, the Petersburg Clubhouse – the location of which was not revealed in court documents – allegedly took delivery of illegal gambling machines from North Carolina. In March, $580 of gambling proceeds were transported from Petersburg.

The indictment also says drugs flowed through the Petersburg Clubhouse. A member allegedly sold 66 Oxycodone pills and six muscle relaxers in October 2009. On the same day, an undercover agent purchased 3.5 grams of cocaine, which was then taken by Outlaws. In March 2010, an undercover agent purchased 2.85 pounds of marijuana at the cost of $13,680 from a fellow Outlaw. That Outlaw was later stopped attempting to transport another five pounds of marijuana from Montana to Virginia.

The Outlaws moved into Virginia in 2006 after coming to an accord with the Pagans Motorcycle Club. Members must be men over age 21 who own a domestic motorcycle. They attempted to expand their profile with a “show of force” of national members, along with Pagans, at a Cycle Expo in Richmond. However, law enforcement refused entry to many Outlaws and diffused the threat. In 2007 and 2008, Outlaws threatened members of the Virginia Raiders, Black Pistons and Merciless Souls Motorcycle Club, affiliates of the Hell’s Angels.

The Outlaws website lists chapters in Petersburg and Northern Virginia. The indictment reads that property in White Post, Va., near Winchester, was seized, along with dozens of Harley-Davidson motorcycles.

The Outlaws, formed in Chicago in the 1930s, are longtime rivals of the Hell’s Angels, adopting the slogan “Angels Die in Outlaw States – Adios.” The Hell’s Angels, Pagans, Outlaws, and Bandidos are considered the biggest motorcycle gxxxs by the FBI.

Much of the information that led to the indictments was told to an undercover Outlaws member in the Petersburg Clubhouse.

All 25 of the men that appeared in court yesterday pleaded not guilty to the charges against them and requested a jury trial.

They will all appear in court on Oct. 20 for the start of what prosecutors are estimating will be a two-week trial.

The 12-count indictment – which was returned on June 10 – charges that the men participated in a criminal enterprise that engaged in a wide range of crimes, including attempted murder, kidnapping, assault, robbery, extortion, witness intimidation, narcotics distribution, illegal gambling and weapons violations.

http://progress-index.com/news/biker-gang-members-arraigned-in-federal-court-yesterday-morning-1.871383

Mar 042010
 


Outlaw motorcycle [clubs] might claim to be good ol’ boys who like to ride bikes, but law enforcement officers say that by definition, outlaw [club] members are involved in crime. Kevin Thom, director of the Attorney General’s Division of Criminal Investigation, said that he considers outlaw [clubs] to be organized crime.

To keep track of [club] activity, DCI completes a report at the end of the Sturgis motorcycle rally tallying all contacts officers have with [club] members and gathering intelligence information. Officers note who is enrolled in which [club] and what roles individuals have within the [clubs].

The information is then put into a report a few inches thick and shared with 35 states and five foreign countries that have an interest in the information, Thom said.

The information gathered this year will be used by DCI to prepare officers for the next year’s rally, Thom said. DCI puts together a Law Enforcement Safety Bulletin, a handbook of outlaw [clubs]‘ identifiers and terminology, a timeline of violent motorcycle [club] involvement in South Dakota from 1981 to the present, and acts of violence nationally in the current year.

The crimes traditionally committed by outlaw [clubs] during the rally are drug possession and distribution, motorcycle theft and assault, according to Pat West, director of the Rapid City DCI office. In general, [club] members don’t commit random attacks against others. “If you mind your own business, everything will be fine,” West said. “If you pick a fight, you’ll get one.”

Anyone picking a fight with one [club] member might get more of a fight than he can handle, West said, because other [club] members will join in. “Every one of them is loyal to those colors and that group,” West said.

Law officers have been concerned in the past that [club] violence would erupt at the rally because of disputes between [clubs] in other parts of the country. In April 2002, a shootout between the Hells Angels and the Mongols in Laughlin, Nev., left three dead and 12 hospitalized. In February the same year, a fight between Hells Angels and Pagans in Plainview, N.Y., killed one and injured 10, according to the Associated Press.

Authorities here were alert for signs of problems at the 2002 rally, but none occurred, Thom said.

“Rivalries between [clubs] ebb and flow,” West said.

Motorcycle thefts are big business for outlaw [clubs], and professional thieves work motorcycle rallies, Thom said. Law enforcement officers work to prevent thefts and recover stolen bikes, and representatives of the National Insurance Crime Bureau come here to try to identify stolen motorcycles and parts.

Locally, the Bandidos is the only outlaw [club] with official chapters, two in the Black Hills and one East River. Hells Angels owns 120 acres north of Sturgis, and the Sons of Silence have a 10-acre campground seven miles north of Sturgis, Thom said.

A Rapid City Bandido, Christopher Horlock, 44, turned himself in June 21 in Houston after being indicted with 25 other people in Seattle, the AP reported.

Horlock, a national regional secretary for the Bandidos, was wanted on charges of conspiracy to tamper with a witness.

Horlock’s indictment and arrest was part of an offensive launched by federal agents and police against the Bandidos after a two-year investigation, according to the AP. Authorities served arrest and search warrants in Washington, Montana and South Dakota.

Source: know[clubs].com

Feb 092010
 

I have written a little bit about the problems that can come up from someone wearing the wrong thing at the wrong time or in the wrong place.  Well, there is a new jacket being put out that is very, very cool, but might also be a little too close in design to a club’s colors.

Motorcycle Action Group (MAG) member and West Midlands resident Carl Lolley says he believes the logo on Triumph’s Marlon Brando jacket is too similar to that of notorious biker group the Outlaws.

“This is the area where the guys who killed [Hell’s Angel] Gerry Tobin came from. It’s still very touchy. Wearing something like that could get you hurt”.

Both logos feature a skull and crossed pistons, though Triumph says its jacket is solely a tribute to Brando’s character Johnny Strabler from movie The Wild One (the letters stand for Black Rebel Motorcycle Club), and has nothing whatever to do with the Outlaws’ infamous emblem, known as Charlie.

There are many of you who live in areas where this will not be a problem at all, but if you are the slightest bit worried about it, pass on this jacket.  Better to not accidentally get into something if you can avoid it.

Love, Respect, and Ride Safe,

ArtBiker

A previous, related post may be read here.

Aug 112009
 

Lots going on during Sturgis week and here is the second installment of the news that you may have missed and might be interested to know.

Hells Angels and Outlaws too close for police comfort.  Cops in Wisconsin were on high alert as the Outlaws were in town for a weekend rally while the Angels were having their own shindig just over the state line in Carlton, Minnesota.  No trouble between the two clubs arose, but the cops sure had a field day handing out tickets.  Good news is that the bikers were not the ones getting citations… both clubs escaped their weekend fairly unscathed.  That being said, even business owners in Carlton are complaining about the way local authorities handled the Angels.

Bandidos spend the weekend in Colorado.  Law-enforcement officers expected between 400 and 1,100 members of the Bandidos motorcycle club at a rally west of Pueblo.  Local police and the Pueblo County Sheriff’s Office said they didn’t expect trouble but were preparing.  So far, no news is good news…

North Carolina police braces themselves for arrival of about 600 Hells Angels to pay respect to fallen Brother, Winston-Salem Chapter President Dwight Sluder, found shot to death in his Baux Mountain Road home.  Law enforcement was on high alert because they had yet to gain many details in the case and wanted to err on the side of “community” safety.  The funeral proceeded without incident.

Deadwood’s Sturgis Legends Ride benefitting the Black Hills Children’s Home Society and the Sturgis Motorcycle Museum & Hall of Fame led 250 bikes on a beautiful ride.  The $150/head entrance fee went straight to the charities and a load of people had a really great ride led by famous folks like Steven Tyler, John Paul DeJoria, Lorenzo Lamas, and a huge slew of famous bike builder who were in Sturgis to show off their wares.

The Hamsters Motorcycle Club shattered their own record this year in raising funds for Children’s Care of Rapid City.  The club is a formidable Who’s Who of big time bike builders and affluent custom bike riders (you don’t have to be rich to be a member, but you do have to RIDE a custom sled… not trailer, but ride).  $285,000 was raised and much of that came from the auction of an Arlen Ness bike that was donated to the cause.  Ness had built the bike for a member of the Hamsters, Craig Betz, who passed away after a battle with cancer.  Betz’s sister made sure the bike went back to the club to raise money for their favorite charity.  Thanks Cecily!

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